Competitive Events

International Public Debate Association (IPDA)

NNU competes in IPDA debate at most tournaments.  These are one-on-one 26 minute debates about current events.  Debaters have 30 minutes to prepare once they've chosen one of five topics.

Individual Events

  • All events have a time limit of ten minutes maximum unless otherwise noted.
  • Materials must not have been used in competition by the competitor prior to Sept. 1 of the competition year.
  • A contestant may not use the same cutting/content or any portion of that cutting/content in more than one prepared event at this tournament.

Extemp

  1. Students will have 30 minutes to prepare, with the aid of any research materials but not the aid of colleagues or coaches, a speech that is the original work of the student.
  2. The contestant will select one of three topics. Topics will be chosen from current events. Some tournaments ask students to craft a relevant current events question from one of two political cartoons.
  3. Maximum time limit for the speech is seven minutes.
  4. Note cards may be used.

Prose

  1. The program may consist of single or multiple selections around a central theme. Plays are not permitted.
  2. Introductions and transitions are included in the time limit.
  3. Manuscripts are to be used.

Informative

  1. The speech must be original and the product of the contestant's own thinking.
  2. The purpose is to inform the audience about some worthwhile subject.
  3. Research should be involved. The speech should not be a personal experience or the retelling of a movie plot, etc.
  4. Audio/visual aids are permitted.
  5. Although the speech should be memorized, competitors may use note cards. If note cards are used, rank and/or rate may be lowered at the judge's discretion.

After Dinner

  1. An original speech to entertain with the purpose of making a serious point through the use of humor.
  2. The speech should be organized around a central theme and should not be a string of jokes.
  3. Although the speech should be memorized, competitors may use note cards. If note cards are used, rank and/or rate may be lowered at the judge's discretion.

Communication Analysis or Rhetorical Criticism

  1. An original speech designed to offer an explanation and/or evaluation of a communication event through the use of rhetorical principles.
  2. Events may include: speech, speaker, movement, poem, poster, film, campaign, etc.
  3. Audio/visual aids may be used to supplement and reinforce the message.
  4. Although the speech should be memorized, competitors may use note cards. If note cards are used, rank and/or rate may be lowered at the judge's discretion.

Program Oral Interpretation (POI)

  1. A program of thematically-linked selections.
  2. Selections must be chosen from at least two of the three recognized genres (prose/poetry/drama).
  3. A substantial portion of the total time must be devoted the chosen genres.
  4. Introductions and transitions are included in the time limit.
  5. Manuscripts are to be used.

Persuasion

  1. The speech must be original and the product of the contestant's own thinking.
  2. The speech should inspire, reinforce, or change beliefs, attitudes, values, or actions of the audience. Research should be involved.
  3. Audio/visual aids are permitted.
  4. Although the speech should be memorized, competitors may use note cards. If note cards are used, rank and/or rate may be lowered at the judge's discretion.

Poetry

  1. The program may consist of single or multiple selections around a central theme.
  2. Plays are not permitted.
  3. Introduction and transitions are included in the time limit.
  4. Manuscripts are to be used.

Impromptu

  1. Contestants will choose one topic from a choice of three, some tournaments will give each speaker the same topic which may be proverbs, great quotations or even bumper stickers.
  2. Speakers will have a total of 7 minutes for both preparation and speaking.
  3. Note cards may be used.

Duo

  1. A cutting from a play involving the portrayal of two or more characters by two individuals. May be humorous or serious.
  2. This is not an acting event--no costumes, props, lighting, etc., are to be used.
  3. The presentation is from a manuscript.
  4. The focus should be off-stage, not to each other.
  5. The time limit includes an original introduction.

Dramatic Interpretation

  1. A cutting which represents one or more characters.
  2. The play should be of literary merit.
  3. The material may be drawn from stage, screen, or radio.
  4. The introduction is included in the time limit.
  5. Manuscripts are to be used.
(Descriptions from the AFA-NIET website)